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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Dec 28, 2009 10:04am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 12-6-73 Dark Star

In response to LIA and ghostofapig I didn't mean the sound or style of their music was reflective of the other free jazz artists I mentioned,but rather their sense of exploration and willingness to play new and different sounding types of music.I'm aware that they were impressed with Miles performance at the Fillmore,but I don't think it sonically informed their music.As far back as 68' they were playing Coltrane influenced music,Clementine seems to be infused with references to My Favorite Things,point being they were always a bit of a free jazz band and it didn't take a gig with Miles to push them in that direction.On that note I will be honest and say I really don't like Miles or his music,so any chance I get to rip him I do,therefore my opinions on him might be a little skewered.In closing Lia,picking a fight with you on musical matters concerning the Dead would be a foolish venture,I was responding more directly to other posts in this thread and past threads.

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Dec 28, 2009 4:52pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 12-6-73 Dark Star

Clementine has also remindedme of My Favorite Things. During the "fusion" era, and leading up to it, Mile incorporated electric piano. Ditto the Dead as Keith matured in the band. I think hearning Miles opened their ears.

As to the AEC--hate to say it in this forum--but the finest quintet the world has seen. When I got off the bus around late '73, I migrated over to the NYC loft scene. It had all that newborn thrill that the Dead (et al) had for me in the sixties. Always new and exciting, fresh and intimate. I'd say that after the Dead, the band I saw the most was the AEC.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Dec 28, 2009 7:20pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 12-6-73 Dark Star

In full agreement with you on the AEC,sad to say I didn't pick up on them until 81' or thereabouts,but like you I saw them and the individual members in various aggregations around NYC a few hundred times.The Roscoe Mitchell Sound Ensemble provided me with my most lasting live music moment and thats counting 200 Dead shows,100 JGB shows,and countless jazz shows.

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Dec 29, 2009 9:52am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 12-6-73 Dark Star

Lots of downloads at dimeadozen.org.

Wish I'd maintained better contact with that scene after I moved to Atlanta in 1979. I knew a lot of the guys personally. I used to do photography for them and a lot of the other musicians.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Dec 29, 2009 10:18am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 12-6-73 Dark Star

I'm still living in the 20th century technology wise,tapes and cd's.But one of these days soon enough I'll get on the download bandwagon.As you said I also got to know alot of the guy's personally,David Murray and Hamiett Bluiet,and Fred Hopkins in particular.Sadly the jazz scene in NYC started to die out in the late 90's and I lost track of it.

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Dec 29, 2009 10:39am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 12-6-73 Dark Star

Fred was one of the nicest musicians in the bunch--may he rest in peace. David--I met him in 1976 when he'd just made the move to New York. He was somewhat of a prick from the start. Most of the time he was polite, but once he tasted money . . . . He had a standing pitcvh in 1978. He'd record for anyone for 10,000. But the thing was that he was that good--as a player and a composer. His contributions are enormous (though playing with the Dead--I always took that as a ruse to increase his audience).

Bluiet was also outstanding. He was the last person to play at Sam Rivers' Studio Rivbea--in the summer of 1979--the night after the big blowout between Sam and Stanley Crouch (David Murray's mentor) that ended the loft scene.
That was moment I was sorry to have witnessed.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Dec 29, 2009 11:51am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 12-6-73 Dark Star

You are right about Fred,he was one of the nicest people I have ever met.Dave was a little rough around the edges but if you got to know him he had a warm friendly side also,but I met him in the mid 80s when he was more settled in his career and maybe a little wiser than your early encounters.As for Hamiett he had a gruffness about him,but once he realized that I always had good pot we became buddies.Murray is in Paris now,Hamiett lives in St. Louis and like I said the scene in N.Y. is dead.You caught it at it's high point during the loft scene,that must have been big fun.

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Dec 29, 2009 4:19pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 12-6-73 Dark Star

ust like 1967-9 all over again!